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    Tree:  

    Matches 1 to 50 of 4,192

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     #   Notes   Linked to 
    1 - living in Fort Frances when her mother died – DEGAGNE, Lorraine (I16363)
     
    2 a barrel-maker at his fathers factory in lower Quebec City CHARTIER, Louis-Jacques (I16981)
     
    3 In the 1901 Canadian Census, Jean-Baptiste aka Jack was living with his brother Alexandre. His occupation is listed a Steam Ship Captain.
    A biography written about his brother Léon, included a statement that Jean-Baptiste was a captain of the G. B. Green. The G.B. Green, a side wheel paddle boat steamer operated on the Ottawa River moving both passengers and goods.
    In the 1911 Canadian Census, he is married and still worked as a Captain. It further stated that he worked 60 per week for 32 weeks as captain and earned $650. He had a second job at which he earned $240 per year. (The river would freeze in winter.)
    A devastating fire occurred on the G. B. Green at 1 am on the morning of 27 July 1916 while she was alongside the pier. Jack and his son were sleeping aboard as well as six other people. In one hour, the vessel was a charred hulk. Four people died. Jack and his son escaped along with 2 other people. Several articles on the fire and subsequent investigation were written in The Ottowa Journal. No cause of the fire was ever determined and no one was held responsible.  
    CHARTIER, Jean-Baptiste (I10532)
     
    4 living in Pierrepont when 1930 census was taken. In 1982 living in Colton NY ROBERT, Bert (I2947)
     
    5 living in Ste-Beatrice (Joliette), PQ when the 1901 Canadian census was taken CHARTIER-ROBERT, Celina (I3057)
     
    6

    Alexander (Alex) Chartier’s parents brought their family of 10 children from Canada to Dakota Territory near Jefferson, South Dakota in 1876 when Alex was 4 years old. Alex’s mother, Eliza, died before Alex was five years old. His father remarried when Alex was six years old. Alex lived with his father and stepmother until he was about 12 years old at which time he went out on his own to Sioux City, Iowa and lived in a boarding house. At age 13 years Alex was hauling sand with a team of horses and wagon for brick paving on West 7th Street in Sioux City. He contracted Diphtheria during this time and almost died. He was quarantined to a shed behind the boarding house where his landlady would bring food to him. When his throat closed so he couldn’t swallow or breath, she (as related by Alex) fed him two teaspoons of kerosene, which oozed through his closed throat and helped open it up and save his life.
    In the early 1890’s Alex lived in the home of Theophile Brugier near Salix and worked as a farm hand until Brugier sold out there. In the late 1890’s Alex was a bachelor farmer and occasionally attended Saturday night dances at the home of Emmanuel and Mary LeMoine south of Bronson. Alex married Delena LeMoine, niece of Emmanuel and Mary October 3, 1898 in St. Joseph Catholic Church in Salix, Iowa. They farmed several small farms, including a fruit farm about 2 miles southeast of Bronson. They then bought and farmed 360 acres 3 ½ miles east of Bronson. They paid $145 per acre for the farm and paid for it in 10 years (1925), but took on a $2000 mortgage to keep it during the Depression and dry years of the 1930’s.
    Alex could speak both French and English with his normal conversation a combination of both. To most people in the area in the early to middle 1900’s, Chartier was replaced with “Sharky”. This is a close approximation of the French Canadian pronunciation of Chartier, which is probably how it got started. Alex’s auto was a 1927 Model T Ford, which was the only car he ever owned or learned to drive.In his early farming years Alex drove his cattle to the stockyards in Sioux City on horseback going down what is now Morningside Avenue pushing a herd of cattle.
    Alex lived a successful life, raised two sons, handled all of his own business affairs, and accumulated a sizeable estate without being able to read or write except to roughly sign his own name. With the help of his sister, Marie, he memorized the series of prayers in the rosary and the parochial mass so he could participate in the services of the church.
    When the 1900 census was taken, this family was living in Floyd Township (Woodbury), Iowa. In this census Alexander said he was born in North Dakota. When the 1930 census was taken, this family was still living in Floyd Township (Woodbury), Iowa. Alex Chartier was a farmer. In this census he said he was born in Canada and he immigrated to the U.S. in 1893.
     
    CHARTIER, Joseph-Alexandre (I18635)
     
    7

    In the 1910 census Sam is single and living on the White Earth Indian Reservation in Becker County, Minnesota. He is working as a laborer on a “general farm”. He is a lodger with the George and Philamine Bellefuille family and their 9 children. In the 1930 census he is married to Cynthia Gourd Langley living on the farm that Cynthia and her husband Frank Gourd owned. One of her sons with Frank is counted next on the census page. In the 1910 Cynthia can be found with Frank Gourd and their 5 children, Ethel R., age 18; Harris I., age 16; Charles R., age 8; Lee R., age 6; and Stella R., age 2. In this census Cynthia says she was born in Oklahoma and her parents were from Georgia; and she and all of her children are “white”. She also said she had 8 children with 5 of them living. All of the children were born in Oklahoma. When the 1920 census was taken, Cynthia and Lee and Stella Gourd were living in Clough (Morrison), Minnesota. Under race, Cynthia and her two children are listed as white. The 1930 census asks age at first marriage. Sam says he was 31. Since he was 48 at the time of the census that would indicate that he was married to someone in about 1913. In 1930 he had been married to Cynthia for less than 2 years. Maybe he was married to someone at White Earth. There are two grandchildren living with Sam and Cynthia when the 1930 census was taken; probably belonging to children from Cynthia’s marriage to Frank Gourd. Sam, Cynthia, her son and her grandchildren claim to be Indian on the question of race. If Sam had an earlier marriage, it is possible that his wife bore children which may have died at birth or very young. Even the wife may have died while bearing a child. Frank Gourd died 17 Sept. 1911.

     
    CHARTIER, Francois Xavier (Samuel) (I9047)
     
    8

    A fur trapper, V- Charles Chartier became a great voyager to the West from about 1800 to 1814. His trade was partly made with Sault Ste Marie and partly with the territories of the Mid and Far West, either sides of the unexplored boundaries. He came back to the region of L’Assomption with his children in 1814, possibly after the death of his Indian wife. Family tradition indicates that Charles was a half-breed, but there is no documentation to support this. In 1997 Francis Kosalek wrote to the Hudson Bay Fur Co. and determined that Charles worked for the XY Co. in 1805. Both companies listed his debt, which probably means they grubstaked him to go west and obtain furs for them. The Ojibwa (the last syllable is pronounced “way”; the name refers to the peculiar puckered seam of their moccasins: Europeans garbled it into Chippeway and stuck to it so persistently that many Ojibwas today call themselves Chippeways) made up one of the largest nations north of Mexico with a population of 25,000 or more. North of them an almost identical people known as the Cree controlled the enormous spruce-fir country that ran all the way up to Hudson Bay. At the eastern end of Lake Superior, at the present Sault St Marie, the Ojibwa joined with the Ottawa and Potawatomi in a loose confederacy known to white traders as the Three Fires. In the traditions of all three of these tribes they were originally one, and that not too many centuries ago. Gloria Chartier Roebuck found a Michael Dufault who was Chippewa Indian born in Wisconsin, but he lived most of his life in Michigan and Minnesota. Many of the Dufault family lived and died at White Earth Reservation in Minnesota. What this may mean is that Charles went west with members of his mother’s family.

     
    CHARTIER, Charles (I8921)
     
    9

    According to a newspaper clipping in the Kankakee Daily Gazette dated Saturday, January 26, 1901, this family moved to Illinois in 1857, and they lived in a log cabin just west of Beebetown. The year can’t be correct since the family can be found in the 1850 census for Momence (Will County), Illinois. The children and their marriages came from baptismal and marriage records in Quebec and Illinois and from family records. The family is first found in Illinois in the 1850 census for Momence (Will County), Illinois. It looks like the census taker spelled the name “Sharker”, but ancestry.com has it indexed as “Sharkes”. He also had problems with the first names and possibly the sexes of the children. For example he has a male child named Michael, age 5 who is probably Mathilda Chartier. For some reason Julie isn’t in the household when the 1850 census was taken unless Julien (male) is really Julie and Julien (male) died before the family moved to Illinois. Emelie has to be Amelia because in the 1860 census there is a Francois and Emelie (age 37) Leblanc living near the family of Placide Chartier in St-Ann. When the 1860 census was taken, the Placide Chartier family lived in St-Anne (Kankakee), Illinois. Placide was a farmer. On the same census page are the families of Pierre and Phebee Dufresne and Francois and Emelie Leblanc. When the 1870 census was taken, this family was living in Ganeer (Kankakee), Illinois. Placide was a laborer. Living next door was the family of Moses Chartier, Placide and Flavie’s son. Moses Chartier was also a laborer. When the 1880 census was taken, the “Plucid Sharkey” family was living in Falun (Saline), Kansas. Also found in this county in the 1880 census was “Plucid Sharkey”, Moses Sharkey and John Sharkey all three are sons of Placide and Flavie Sharkey.

     
    CHARTIER, Placide (I13536)
     
    10

    According to Diane Chartier Boyd, Curtis Reynolds Chartier ran away from his home in Illinois when he was 11 years old. This is probably an exaggerated age because, Curtis is found living with his family in Chicago when the 1930 census was taken where his age is shown as 15. Curtis made his way to California where he became a professional boxer and wrestler. Diane told Vernon Chartier over the telephone that one time when she visited Knott’s Berry Farm she saw a poster of her father in a boxing pose. Diane also said Curtis’ first wife was a striptease artist and that he was an ardent military man. It seems that at the time Curtis Reynolds Chartier died in Texas, he did not know his father was also living in Texas, which would indicate a strained relationship between father and son. In the September 11, 1959 issue of the El Paso Herald Post, there is a note that says that a divorce was granted between Maria M. Chartier and Curtis R. Chartier. On November 10, 1939 Curtis Reynolds Chartier sailed from Honolulu to Vancouver, B.C. on the S.S. Niagara. He arrived on November 17, 1939. He said his address in the U.S. was “Care Sister; Mrs. W. R. Stevr at 1 Bungalow Ct. in Champaigan, Illinois. The ship sailed back to Honolulu on 22 Nov 1939 and arrived in Honolulu on 29 Nov 1939. Curtis enlisted in the U.S. Army for WWII on 17 Dec 1941 in Los Angeles, California. This, of course, was shortly after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. The enlistment record said he lived in San Bernardino and that he was married. The record also said he had one year of college and was 75” tall and weighed 201 pounds. On Jul 18, 1945 2nd Lt. Curtis R. Chartier arrived in New York Harbor on the General Adolphus W. Greenley.

     
    CHARTIER, Curtis Reynolds (I2825)
     
    11

    According to the Delta County marriage records, Susan was 17 years old when she married Joseph who was 26 years old. Joseph and Susan were both listed as “French Indian”. Joseph was a woodworker and Susan was a house worker. According to the Delta County marriage records, Susan was 17 years old when she married Joseph who was 26 years old. Joseph and Susan were both listed as “French Indian”. Joseph was a woodworker and Susan was a house worker. When the 1880 census was taken, Joseph was living with his “Ke-O-Quom family in Elbridge (Oceana), Michigan. His father was a farmer. When the 1910 census was taken, there is a Joseph “Keoquon” living in the home of Louie and Elizabeth Bailey in Elbridge (Oceana), Michigan. He is 36 and single and is Louie’s brother-n-law. This seems to be the correct Joseph, but why is he listed as single and where is Susan. He is a laborer, odd jobs. When Joe Kequom registered for the WWI draft on Sept. 12, 1918, he was living at 1709 Furview in Muskegon (Muskegon), Michigan. He was a laborer for Campbell-Tryant Cannon Foundry Co. in Muskegon Heights. He said he was “partially lost sight of right eye”. When the 1920 census was taken, this family was living in Elbridge (Oceana), Michigan. Joseph was a farmer, general farm. When the 1930 census was taken, this family was living in Manistique (Schoolcraft), Michigan. Joe was a laborer, woods work. From family records it appears that Joseph had a first marriage to Angeline Kewayquoum, and Gertrude was a daughter from this first marriage. However, this does not make any sense based upon the date that Joe married Susan Sharkey. Also, these family records say that Joseph’s parents were William Ke-quom and Fannie Bailey. According to family members, Joseph Kequom was the Chief of the Grand River Band of Ottawa Tribe, 1909 Elbridge (Oceana), Michigan.

     
    SHARKEY, Susan (Susie) (I7796)
     
    12

    According to the Michigan marriage records at familysearch.org, there is an Ohrino or Phrews Chartier who married
    Mary McCarty in Calumet (Houghton), Michigan on 17 May 1880. Ohrino is 23 years old, born in Canada and
    Mary is 17 years old, born in Michigan. Ohrino’s residence is Keweenaw County and Mary’s residence is Calumet
    Witnesses to the marriage were Fred Laphron and Mary Heiker, both residences of Keweenaw. When the 1880
    census was taken, “Frank and Ellen Sharkey” are living in Allouez Township (Kewneeaw County), Michigan. Frank
    is 21, born in Canada. Ellen is 18, born in Michigan. Her parents were born in Ireland. Frank worked in what looks
    like a copper mill. When the 1900 census was taken, Frank Sharkey was a boarder the home of Joseph Neil in a
    rail road and logging camp in Elm River Township, Houghton County. Frank was a common laborer. The census
    record says he is married, but there is no wife with him. This record says he immigrated in 1874. When the 1910
    census was taken, there was a Frank “Sharky” who was 55 years old and a widower living in the home of his sister’s
    family, Celestial Schocy on Edgewood Road in Stanton Township in Houghton County, Mich. He was a laborer
    in a stamp mill. If this is the above Frank Chartier, then he belongs to Section E-12 of Volume II where there is a
    Francois Chartier, born Ste Julienne on 06 Feb 1856 with a confirmation on 07 Oct 1868. This Francois Chartier is
    the 7th child born to Joseph Chartier and Marcelline Larche. We know of two other brothers, Joseph-Hildege and
    Maxime who settled in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. In the 1900 census Frank says he immigrated in 1874
    which is about right since he can be found in the 1871 census. In the 1910 census Franks says he immigrated in
    1877. When the 1920 census was taken, there is a Frank Chartier living in Laurium (Houghton), Michigan. He is a
    widower, 76 years old and says he immigrated in 1868. He has no occupation.


     
    CHARTIER, Francois (I6653)
     
    13

    aka SHARKEY. A sailor. Died in a violent accident.
    When the 1880 census was taken, this family was living in New Baltimore (Macomb), Mich. “Gabriel Sherkey: was a sailor. When the 1900 census was taken, the William Chorkey family was still living in New Baltimore. William and Arthur were sailors. When the 1910 census was taken, it appears that Phoebe had remarried as Bessie, William, Grace and “Bertie” Chartier are living in the home of John and “Phoeba” Lervay (Leroy?) on Maine St. in New Baltimore. John was a sailor on a merchant ship, Bessie was a saleswoman in a dry goods store, and William was a laborer in a factory. Phoebe and John were married in New Baltimor on 05 Aug 1908. When the 1930 census was taken, “Febe Leray” was heading up a family at 986 Meldrum Ave. in Detroit, Michigan. In the household were her daughters, Bessie and Grace and her son, Bert and her grandson, Hazen, age 7. The name is Sharkey in this census. Grace was a teacher and Bert was a construction electrician. When the 1930 census was taken, Phebe is a widow. Her name in the census records is spelled Phebe Coutture. Also in the household is her daughter, Bessie and a “son” Hazen or Hayer. Phebe married Albert Couture in New Baltimore on 08 Sep 1922. Bert and Margaret Sharkey were witnesses to the marriage. Albert Coutere (Couteure) was a civil war veteran; a soldier in the Iron Brigade which sustained the greatest percentage of loss of any in the entire union. This brigade stood as honory guards at Lincoln’s burial. Albert died at his home (35910 Main St. in New Baltimore) on 31 Jan 1918. He is buried in St-Paul’s cemetery in Grosse Pointe. William Sharkey was a mate on the boat “Maude E. Preston” and was Captain of the “Lily” of Mt. Clemens. He was also a mate on the “City of New Baltimore” .
     
    CHARTIER, Gabriel William (I8643)
     
    14

    Alexandre Chartier, on his application for a War Pension pretended that in April 1814 he was employed at Vergennes, Vermont to carry timber for the construction of the ship “Saratoga” at the very end of such construction. Then in May 15 being at Fort Carson, he was engaged as a volunteer-sailor on the same ship, until the arrival of the marine (August 20, 1814). The around the first of September, still according to his own account, he went as a volunteer on Sept. 8 to Captain Gedeon Spendard’s Co. to be in the first rank at the battle of Lunetry. He was discharged shortly after. This application was made from Massena, NY.

    When the 1840 census was taken, the Alexander Carter household in Massena (Saint Lawrence), NY had one male between 40 and 50; one female under 5 years old; and 3 females between 30 and 40. When the 1850 census was taken, the Alexander Carter family was living in Massena. Alexander was a farmer. In the next household was Mary Carter, age 42, who was born in Vermont. This is probably Alexander’s sister and was probably one of the two females between 30 and 40 in Alexander’s household in the 1840 census. When the 1860 census was taken, this family was still living in Massena and Alexander was still a farmer. And, Marry was still living in the next household where she was a “tailoress”. When the 1870 census was taken, the Alexander “Carty” family was still living in Massena. Alexander was still a farmer, and Mary was now in the household as an assistant housekeeper. Laura wasn’t in the household which probably means she married before 1840. When the 1880 census was taken, this family was still living in Massena and Alexander was now a widower and still a farmer. His sister Mary is still living in the household as is his daughter, Sally. From the military records for Alexander’s father, it appear that his widowed mother was living with him in 1838; but she isn’t in the household when the 1840 census was taken. That probably means she died before 1840.

     
    CHARTIER, Alexander (I12823)
     
    15

    Antoine in 1776 (then 11 years old) was enlisted as a fifer in the American Revolution. He is mentioned again as a fifer in 1777 at Albany Major George Nicholson’s detachment. His parents were then residing in Fishkill, Ny, where in 1778 the same “Anthony Shirkey” enlisted in Colonel Hazen’s Regiment as a private and served until Aug 1783 when he was discharged at Snake Hill, NY. He had served in the battles of White Plaines, Springfield, Trenton, Brandywine, Germantown, taking of Burgoyne, Monmouth, Stony Point and Cornwallis. In 1787, he is mentioned as residing at Chazy, NY with a family of 3 (one child). In 1818 he was residing at Acunlius (Cayuga), NY. Like the family of Antoine’s brother, Pierre, there was a legend that both Pierre and Antoine came to America from France with Lafayette. This would indicate that somehow the connection of these two families with that of the Deerfield refugee, John Carter, was not known or was not passed down through the generations in these families. When the 1800 census was taken, there was an Anthony Carter in Milton (Cayuga), NY. In the household was 1 male between 10 and 15; 2 males between 26 and 44; and 1 female between 16 and 25. This is probably the right family; but there are children missing and even the mother seems to be missing. Anthony could not be found in the 1810 census. When the 1820 census was taken, this family was living in Aurelius (Cayuga), NY. In the household was one male over 45; a female under 10; 1 female between 16 and 26; and a female over 45. Anthony could not be found in the 1830 census which might mean he was living in someone’s household. Anthony Carter, alias Shirkee, is listed as a pensioner in Cayuga in an 1835 record. This record says he was a private in Hazen’s Regiment. He was placed on the pension roll on March 24, 1819 and his pension commenced on April 8, 1818. His annual allowance was $96.00; and up to that date had received $1527.16.

     
    CHARTIER, Antoine-Marie (I12833)
     
    16

    Died at Mercy Hospital. Marshall Chartier was a barber in Valparaiso, Indiana in 1891-1892. His place of residence at that time was 192 Indiana Avenue. He opened a barbershop in Chesterton, IN on March 9, 1893. He closed it in June 1893 and went to work for Joe Doyle in Valparaiso. In Cooks Corners Items Marshall is shown as one of 7 barbers. On January 30, 1896 Marshall Chartier is shown as moving to Hammond. When the 1900 census was taken, Minnie Chartier and her two children were living in the home of her parents, John and Della Clifford at 64 West Chicago St. in Valparaiso. John Clifford was a railroad construction contractor. Minnie had a second marriage to James A. McNay in about 1905. When the 1910 census was taken, James and Minnie McNay and her two children from her first marriage were living at 108 Michigan St. in Center Township (Porter), Indiana. James was a salesman in a dry goods store. In this census Minnie says she is the mother of 3 children with all 3 of them living. There is a two year old daughter, Margaret McNay that she had with James. There is also a Hazel McNay, age 20, James’ daughter by his first marriage in the household. Hazel was a public school teacher. When the 1920 census was taken, James and Minnie McNay were living at 108 Monroe St. in Valparaiso, Indiana with their two children, Margaret, age 12, and John Robert, age 6. James was a clerk at a department store. When the 1930 census was taken, the family of James and Minnie McNay were still living at 108 Monroe St. in Valparaiso with their 16 year old son, Jack. James was a clerk in a clothing store. When the 1940 census was taken, Minnie was a widow living in the home of her daughter’s family Marvin and Margaret Cain at 507 Lafayette St. in Valparaiso.

     
    CHARTIER, Marshall (I13900)
     
    17 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. CHARTIER, Barbara (I17941)
     
    18

    Dr. Theodore J. Benac earned a bachelors of science degree in chemistry and philosophy from St. Michael College in Vermont in 1933. He continued his education and received a master of science in mathematics from Connecticut State College in 1934 and a doctorate in mathematics from Yale University in 1941.

    Originally from Lisbon, Conn., Dr. Benac arrived at the Naval Academy on July 1, 1941, five months before the bombing of Pearl Harbor. For more than half a century, he taught algebra, calculus and thermodynamics to thousands of midshipmen. He was responsible for teaching two of the required courses in mathematics at the Naval Academy at the time of his death.

    During his teaching career at the academy, Benac witnessed milestones such as the first Black midshipman who graduated in 1949, Roger Staubach as Navy quarterback in the mid-60s and the admission of women in 1976.

    Throughout his distinguished career at the academy, Dr. Benac taught the full spectrum of undergraduate courses in mathematics. He served for 12 years as the chairman of the mathematics department, and coordinated the innovative "calculus with computers" program at the academy beginning in 1969. His expertise and teaching skills were recognized in 1990 when the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) named him the Maryland State Professor of the Year. Dr. Benac served as Grand Marshall for the Academic Procession at all Naval Academy graduations from 1972 until 1997.

    Dr. Benac served on the Naval Academy Admissions Board and on a variety of curriculum committees. He personally authored three textbooks, translated five textbooks from German to English and wrote articles and abstracts for publication by the American Mathematical Society and the International Mathematics Congress.
    Benac received the Navy Superior Civilian Service Award in 1982, the Alumni Association Civilian Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence in 1989 and the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1989. In 1998 the Civilian Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching was renamed in Honor of Dr. Benac.

    When Dr. Benac died he was survived by his wife, his sister, his three children and five grandchildren

     
    BENAC, Theodore J. (I21120)
     
    19

    Edward Chartier had a farm in Paris, Texas which he lost. He established the first commercial college in Paris Texas in about 1887, which for several years was largely attended, and was a successful institution. In 1891 Edward sold the college to W. F. White and Curtis P. Coe and the Rev. A. W. Colver. These men established a literary department under the name of North Texas State University and continued the business department. After selling his school in Paris, Professor Chartier went to Sioux City, Iowa and then to Findlay, Ohio where he had schools. He later returned to Paris and started another commercial school. Edward had perfected a system of shorthand with a guy named Spencer, which was said to be simpler and faster than the old Pittman and other systems. He sold this second school in Paris and went out on the road selling his shorthand system and demonstrating it to the teachers in colleges that purchased it. It is said that Edward ran off to California with Spencer’s secretary when Clara Bell refused her husband’s request to let her move in with the family. When the 1900 census was taken, Edward and Clara and family were living at 911North High St. in Paris (Lamar), Texas. Edward was a schoolteacher. When the 1910 census was taken, Edward and Mable Chartier were lodgers in the home of Charles and Annie Sims at 1522 Franklin St. in Oakland (Alameda), Calif. Edward was a publishing manager. In this census Edward and Mable say they have been married 3 years, and Mable says she is the mother of no children. When the 1920 census was taken, Edward and May Belle were living on South Court St. in Center Township (Lake), Indiana. His occupation is very difficult to read in this census; but it looks like he was some kind of publisher. When the 1930 census was taken, May Belle was living at 2915 Juniper St. in San Diego.

     
    CHARTIER, Edward Morris (I2823)
     
    20

    Elaine was a popular Cape Cod Mental Health Counselor and Past Chair of the Massachusetts Governors Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse.She graduated from Canton High School in 1967. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice from Northeastern University in Boston in 1973 and received her Masters in Education (M.Ed) with a major in Psychology from Boston College in 1979. Mrs. Piepgrass was a licensed Mental Health Counselor, licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, and a Certified Alcoholism Counselor that specialized in Substance Abuse and Addictions. She was a member of several professional organizations including the American Association for Counseling and Development, the American Mental Health Counselors Association, American Counseling Association, the Massachusetts Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, and the Massachusetts Mental Health Counselors Association. Mrs. Piepgrass was a popular speaker on the topics of personal relationships, substance abuse and addictions. Prior to her being diagnosed with breast cancer in 1989, she had been approached by a radio station about the possibility of doing a radio talk show about substance abuse, alcoholism, and related topics. She was employed at the Massachusetts Correction Institution (MCI) Bridgewater, Masssashusetts from 1971 until 1977, when she left to go into private practice. She was also employed on a part time basis by the Thorne Clinic located on the grounds of the Barnstable County Hospital in Pocasset, from 1986 until 1994. Mrs Piepgrass served as a Special Police Officer for the Town of Bourne Police Department for many years during the 1970s and 1980s. She specialized in cases that related to rape or sexual assaults as well as child abuse or molestation cases, and also served as a lecturer at the Southeastern Massachusetts Regional Police Academy in Fall River. She was an avid horsewoman who owned her own horse, and she rode out of Autumn Farm Stable in Middleboro. Mrs Piepgrass was very active in community afffairs, and in the past had served as a volunteer in the Bourne School system and also as a member and speaker for the Bourne Partners in Education and the Bourne Council of Volunteers. Mrs. Piepgrass was an accomplished amateur actress that had many starring roles in various theatrical productions for several Cape Cod theatre groups. These groups included the Cotuit Center for the Arts, Bourne Theater on the Bay and the Cape Cod Community College. The highlight of her amateur acting career came in 1992-1993, when she won "Best Actress in a Dramatic Role" awarded by the Cape Cod Association for Community Theater Excellence for her starring role in the Theater on the Bay production of "The Effects of Gamma Rays on Man in the Moon Marigolds".

     
    CHARTIER, Elaine M. (I14773)
     
    21

    Guyon Carter received his education from the Canisteo Academy, 1901; Canisteo Teacher’s Training Class, 1902; Alfred University, B.S., 1910 (Cum Laude); Columbia University, M.A., 1924; research study in Europe, 1927; research study in Montreal and Quebec, 1929; graduate study, New York University, 1933; and following. Guyon Carter was one of 180 district school superintendents elected Aug 15, 1911 in the first election under then a new New York State law providing for supervisory districts. When Guyon retired in June 1956, he was the last of the state’s original district school superintendents. At the time of his retirement, Guyon was superintendent of a Northern Steuben County district that included Avoca, Cohoctan, Prattsburg, and Wayland.

    When Guyon registered for the WWI draft on 12 Sep 1918; he was Superintendent of Schools, State of New York in Avoca (Steuben), NY. He and Laura lived on Oliver St. in Avoca. When the 1920 census was taken, Guyon and Laura were living in Avoca, and he was still superintendent of schools. When the 1930 census was taken, Guyon and Laura were living in Avoca (Steuben), NY. Guyon was still a superintendent of schools.

    In 1910 when Guyon J. Carter was manager of The Men’s dormitory of Burdick Hall (Alfred University) in Alfred, NY; he wrote a letter to the War Pension Department in Washington, D.C. He seemed to be in possession of domestic papers showing to a great extent his family’s genealogy. The papers showed that he had information from III-Antoine to his day. However, Guyon assumed that III-Antoine Chartier who was his first ancestor had come from France as a soldier with General Lafayette during the American Revolutionary War. In 1920 when Guyon was Superintendent of Supervisory District No. 6 of the New York State Department of Education for Stueben County, he wrote another letter to to the War Pension Department. At that time he was informed about the place and date of the birth of III-Antoine. In 1982 both Jean Robert and Vernon Chartier had the chance to correspond with him; and Guyon was still able to write his own letters. Guyon died in St-Petersburg, Florida on 21 Jan 1990 at the age of 104 years. He had no children by either one of his wives.

     
    CARTER, Guyon John (I12876)
     
    22

    Hattie was raised in Detroit. She was the third of ten children. She attended St. Hedwig School until the eigth grade when she went to work in a laundry to help support her family. Later she worked for US Rubber. She married Bruno Cherney in 1939, had three children and lived in La Crescenta, CA for five years. In 1951, Hattie moved back to Detroit with her children. She then married Delmont Shorkey and had a fourth child. She raised her family in Flint while working for Ternstedt. As her children grew older, she attended many enrichment classes, upholstery classes and specialized her sewing skills. She also attended night school and earned her high school diploma. After retiring from Ternstedt, Hattie attended and graduated from Flint Barber College. She worked at Dons Barbers Shop in Flushing for many years before retiring to Caseville. After her husbands death, Hattie divided her time between her family in Clio, New Baltimore and Cape Cod, MA. Hattie lived a hard working and active life. She loved sewing, gardening, bowling (with the big balls), fishing in Caseville and Marthas Vineyard and playing cards, being the "Skip-Bo Queen." She more recently was a member of the Clio Senior Center, "The Over 80s Group" at the Dennis Senior Center in MA., and All Saints Parish in Flint for many years. Hattie was a very loving and giving mother and grandmother. She practiced tithing and was a lifelong contributor to the Leader Dogs for the Blind and Boysville. She was survived by: a son Frank Cherney of New Baltimore; 3 daughters Roberta (Jerry) Rooney of Clio, Denise Kassarjian of MA, Michele (Gary) Szewczyk of Clio; 7 grandchildren; 4 great-grandchildren; 2 sisters and a brother, Ann Graham, Alex (Illah) Syper and Johanna Gibson. She was also preceded in death by a daughter-in-law Judene; 2 brothers and 4 sisters.

     
    SHORKEY, Delmont Victor (I6128)
     
    23

    In an affidavit in the County of Morrison (State of Minnesota) dated 21 Dec. 1889 Charles Chartier swore that “he is a mixed blood of the Chippewa tribes of the State of Minnesota. That as he is informed and believes, his Grandmother was a full blood Chippewa Indian woman; that her daughter, affiants, mother married a man by his name., Charles Chartier. That before her marriage her name was Margaret Grant, the daughter of J. B. Grant, a trader among the Indians. “Later on in this affidavit Charles states that he himself, this affiant, is one-half Chippewa blood, his father as well as his mother being each half blood Chippewa Indians.” The problem with this statement is that there is no proof that Charles’ father was a 1/2 breed. Charles Chartier was also known as Sha-tay-ke-wainze which probably was a name given to him by Indians. Even though Charles was born in Wisconsin, it seems that he and his brother “lived with his father and squaw mother near Winnipeg, Canada; that the father took said Charles CHARTIER and brother with him to Canada.” After Charles and his brother were baptized, they must have returned to the west because it seems a child was born to Charles Chartier and a Sautich woman. However, Charles is found in Quebec in 1853. Madison Overmoen determined that this family left Quebec in late 1853 or 1854. They may have moved to Bourbonnais, Ill, and stayed there approximately one year; then traveling by ox cart to Belle Prairie, Minn. Charles Chartier’s obituary indicates that the family “removed from Illinois” to Belle Prairie in 1852”. According to the Naturalization Index “Charles Chartier arrived in Minnesota 10th Sept 1854.” The date of the documentation is October 1869.

     
    CHARTIER, Charles (I8922)
     
    24

    In Chambly Francois Chartier was a carpenter, a trade that he followed throughout his life. He was also a British soldier in the War of 1812. In 1847 he and Josette and the children that were still at home moved to Keeseville, NY where Moise and probably the younger children had the opportunity to go to school. In 1855 Francois moved the family to Bourbonnais, Illinois probably on the encouragement of his son, Louis Chartier who had located from St Luc to Bourbonnais in about 1849. Bourbonnais was a community started by a French-Canadian Priest, as was St Anne, Illinois. These priests actively recruited French-Canadians to move to this part of Illinois, which wasn’t that difficult after the Quebec Revolution of 1837 – 1839. After this Revolution, the English clamped down on French-Canadian activities and opportunities. The Priests in Illinois planted in the minds of the French-Canadians they recruited to this part of Illinois that the territory would become a French speaking country more promising than Quebec itself. The family moved to Ste Anne, Illinois in 1859 a community started by Father Chiniquy who was excommunicated from the Catholic Church in 1858. Father Chiniquy, however, persuaded 80% of his congregation to join him in the formation of the church called The Christian Catholic Church, which later became the Ste Anne Presbyterian Church. In Moses Chartier’s biography in “Portrait and Biographical Record of Kankakee County, Illinois” Francois became sick while on a visit to his daughter in Kankakee. This is one of the basis for the connecting the marriage of Marie-Anne-Ermedlinde Chartier and Lewis Sheffer. Hower, this couple can not be found in the 1860 or 1870 census. When the 1850 census was taken, the “Francis Shorkey” family was living in Ausable (Clinton), New York. Francis and Leander were laborers. When the 1860 census was taken, the “Francis Chartier” family was living in St Ann (Kankakee), Illinois. Francis was a carpenter, Israel was a farmer, “Moyse” was a joiner, and Raphael was a student.

     
    CHARTIER, Francois (I11654)
     
    25

    In the 1820 census for Vergennes (Addison), Vermont there is a James Carter. The household had 2 males under 10 years; one male between 26 and 45; 1 female under 10; 1 female between 10 and 16; and one female between 16 and 26. The age for the male head of the household fits with the age James would be in 1820. When the 1830 census was taken, there is Jacob V. Carter family in Ferrisburg. This household had 1 male between 15 and 20; 1 male between 60 and 70; 1 female between 5 and 10; and one female between 60 and 70. The age for the male heading up the household is too old to be either Jacob or James Carter; and no one else with this name can be found in the 1830 census for Addison County. When the 1840 census was taken, there is a James Carter in Addison County. The household had 1 male between 50 and 60 which fits James Carters age; 2 females between 5 and 10; 2 females between 10 and 15; 1 female between 15 and 20; and 1 female between 40 and 50. The ages of this James and his wife fit the ages found in the 1820 census. According to the history of Addison County, a son of Pierre Chartie built a log house on Otter Creek, a mile below the falls and gave the name to the “Sharkey Bend” in the creek. The article says his name was John Carter, but it was probably Jacob/James Carter. The article also said that the widow of his son Jacob (also a pensioner) died in Vergennes in September, 1885. James or Jacob Carter could not be found in the 1850 Addison County census. When the 1860 census was taken, there is a James Carter, age 80 and born in Canada living in Ferrisburg with his wife Harriet, age 63 and born in Canada. These ages fit what was found in the 1820 and 1840 censuses. When the 1870 census was taken, there is a James Carter, age 93 and his wife Harriet Carter, age 69 living in Ferrieburg. James was a retired farmer. The problem with this record is that it says both James and Harriet were born in New Hampshire. Also in the household was a 12 year old girl, Clarissa Reynold who was born in Vermont.When the 1880 census was taken, Harriet was a widow living by herself in Ferrisburg. In this census she was 79 years old.

     
    CHARTIER, Jacques (Jacob or James) (I12817)
     
    26

    In the 1877 and 1880 Brooklyn directories Raphael was living at 46 Ryerson. His occupation in 1877 was groceries. And in 1880 was clerk. In the 1881 Brooklyn directory, Raphael’s occupation was liquors located at on Ralph Avenue & Madison. In the 1884 Brooklyn directory Raphael was still involved with liquors, but now at Broadway & Van Buren. In the 1880 and 1900 census records Raphael Chartier says he was born in New York, but that was found not to be true when his baptismal record in L’Acadie, Quebec was found in November 2003. Since Raphael could sign his name, he probably; went to school both in Keeseville and Bourbonnais and possibly even in St. Anne. On June 4, 1862 he was mistakenly enlisted under the name of Robert T. Chartier in the Civil War where he served as a Private First Class in Company F, 69th Regiment, Illinois Volunteers. He was honorably discharged on 6 Oct 1862. Raphael applied for and received an invalid pension from the U.S. Government when his spine was injured after falling out of a 3-story window. He made the application on 6 Aug 1888, and it was approved on January 4 1892 under the Act of Jun 27, 1890. His invalid pension was $12.00 per month. At that time he and his family were living at 285 Fifth Avenue in Brooklyn, and he was employed as a policeman. Because of the injury, Raphael had to resign as a policeman and became a watchman. On his death certificate his occupation is shown as being a customhouse inspector. On 14 January Mary (Winters) Chartier applied for a Widow’s pension . At that time she was living residing at 420 2nd Street in Brooklyn. Mary was paid $20.00 per month commencing on September 8, 1916. It was increased to $40.00 per month on June 4, 1928. When the 1880 census was taken, Raphael was a liquor dealer in Brooklyn. Ray T. Chartier can be found in the Brooklyn, New York Directory for 1888-1890 where the family lived at 397 5th Avenue in Brooklyn, and Ray’s occupation is “police”. When the 1900 census was taken, this family was living at 279 6th Ave. in Brooklyn. Raphel was a custom inspector; Frank was a painter; and Charles was at school. Mary said she was the mother of 8 children with 4 of them living. When the 1910 census was taken, Mary was heading up a family that included her sons, Frank and Charles. They lived on East First St. in Brooklyn. Frank was a bronzer, decorating and Charles was a fire insurance clerk. In this census Mary says she was the mother of 8 children with 4 of them living. When the 1920 census was taken, Mary and her son Francis who was single were living at 413 Greenwood St. in Brooklyn. Francis was a helper at a Torpedo Works.

     
    CHARTIER, Raphael-Theode (I12406)
     
    27 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. CHARTIER, Joseph Claude Marie (I19492)
     
    28

    Margaret was raised in Pelkie and graduated at age 16 from Baraga High School. She continued her education at Northern Normal School (now Northern Michigan University) where she graduated at age 20 with two minors, one in Chemistry and the other in English. Margarets first teaching assignment was with the Rock River School District at the Eben School. There, her assignment was somewhat unique as many of the students were returning from World War II and were older than her. She also served as class advisor. After Margaret married Arthur A. Nadeau in Baraga, she returned to teaching for a time in Big Bay and then settled into being a homemaker. Once most of her children were older, Margaret returned to teaching on a substitute basis with the public and Catholic schools in Marquette. In 1963, she began a 20-year employment with NMU, serving as manager of the Book Department at the NMU Bookstore. In her leisure and in retirement, she enjoyed being with family, reading, picking berries, riding around Presque Isle, traveling with her children, playing cards and defeating her children, and was an avid NMU hockey fan. Margarets faith and church were very important to her and she was an active member of St. Christopher Catholic Church and its Womens Club, where she participated in numerous parish festivals, funeral dinners, pasty sales, bazaars, bake sales and fish bakes. Her children remember that church activities were central to her life and brought her much happiness.
    Margaret is survived by grandchildren, Nicole (John) Solfest, Daniel Duquette, Amy (Nick Hamari) Duquette, Christy Anttila, Misty Nadeau, Joe Holman, Matthew, Andrew, Emily and Sarah Lorenz, Samantha and Sarah Nadeau, Steven Gustafson, Becky Nadeau, and Jeff and Ken Saarela and great-grandchildren, Ella, Tyler, Olivia, Alex, Cammie, Autumn, Dylan and Jeffrey. She was preceded in death by grandchildren: Matthew Peter Nadeau, Diane Marie Nadeau and Edward David Anttila; great-grandchild, Vanessa Marie; and sister-in-law Elaine Chartier

     
    CHARTIER, Margaret (I7487)
     
    29

    MOISE (Moses) CHARTIER was a prominent citizen of St. Anne, Ill. He was the first President of the Village
    Board, a position he held a number of times. He was at times School Treasurer, Supervisor of the town, and
    postmaster. He was a member of the Village Board for 19 consecutive years. He was the leader of the group of men
    who built the First Presbyterian Church in 1893 , which still stands today. This congregation was originally Roman Catholic started by Father Chiniquy as its priest. Father Chiniquy found it impossible to remain in communion with the Catholic Church authorities. He was suspended in 1856 and ex-communicated in 1858. Being a very charismatic person, he per¬suaded 80% of his congregation to join him in the formation of a new church, which in time became the First Presbyterian Church. This schism split families and bad feel¬ings, which still exist to some ex-tent today. Moise’s brother, Louis who was already married and living in Kankakee, remained Catholic. Moise, his father (Francois) and two older brothers, Leandre and Israel, became Protestant. The youngest brother, Raphael, was married in a Catholic Church in Brooklyn, NY. When the 1870 census was taken, this family was living in Saint Anne, Illinois. Moise was a merchant. When the 1880 census was taken, this family was still living in St. Anne. Moses was a postmaster, and Samuel was a post office clerk. Also in the household was Delia Boilard, age 20, who is listed as a niece and a school teacher. When the 1900 census was taken, this family was living in St Anne. Moise was a landlord. Also in the household was Fannie Chartier who is listed as a step daughter and John, Lada, and Annette Pallisard who are listed as step son, step daughter, and step granddaughter, respectively. Lada (Leda) was Leonie’s daughter by her first marriage to David Durand. When the 1910 census was taken, Leonie was a widow living by herself on her own income in St. Anne.

     
    CHARTIER, Moise-Didace (I12391)
     
    30

    Ohmia in 1880 census. When the 1870 census was taken, “Ohma Shasky” was in the home of his parents in Ispheming (Marquette), Mich. When the 1880 census was taken, “Ohmia Shorkey” was boarding in the home of Joseph and Emma Mayotte in Ispheming. Next door was the family of his brother, “August Shorka”. When the 1900 census was taken, this family was living 360 Harrison St. in Marquette (Marquette), Michigan. Omer was a railroad braker?. In this census both Omer and Alice said they immigrated to the U.S. in 1875. Alice also said that she was the mother of nine children, six that were living. When the 1910 census was taken, the family was still living at 360 Harrison St. Homer Shorkey was a salesman for the railroad; Vincent was a locomotive fireman; Grace was a telephone operator; and Edward was railroad teamster. Their daughter, Eva (Shorkey) Fogarty was also in the household. She said she had been in her present marriage for 7 years; but her husband was not in the household. When Alice died, she was living at 360 Harrison St. in Marquette. When Homer Shorkey married Celina (King) Hebert, he was employed as a passenger brakeman on the M. M. & S. E. train running between Marquette and Little Lake. Celina’s first husband was Alexander Hebert. The marriage between Homer and Celina did not last long because in about 1920 she is found married to George Castle, first in Racine, Wisconsin and later in Essexville, Michigan. Homer may have died shortly after they were married, because he can not be found in either the 1920 or 1930 censuses. However, he filed a Declaration of Intention to become a citizen on 16 May 1919; and he received his Naturalization Papers on 11 Feb 1924. When he filed his “Declaration of Intention” he was a railroader, and when he became naturalized he was a carpenter. In these papers he said he was born in Ste-Elie, Quebec; the he emigrated to the U.S. via the Grand Trunk Railway from Montreal on or about the 15 May 1867and arrived in Detroit on 25 May 1867.
     
    CHARTIER, Omer (I20032)
     
    31

    Roberts birth certificate has his name as Robert Rehfeldt. According to his daughter, Wilhelmina Costanza, Robert’s biological parents probably never married. He was raised by his grandparents, Louis Rehfeldt and Minnie Schabo. However, the only grandchild in the 1920 census in the Louis and Minnie Rehfeldt household is Clarence Rehfeldt, age 8. The age is correct which seems to mean that Robert’s middle name was Clarence or his grandparents preferred that name. Robert’s mother, Emma Rehfeldt had two more marriages. The first one was to F Lewis Hahn who was 15 years older than Emma. She can be found living with F. Lewis in the 1920 census with 6 of his children from his first marriage. His first wife probably had died. After Lewis Hahn died, Emma Rehfeldt Hahn married William J. Nitzband in Menominee, Michigan on 06 Dec 1926. She and William can be found in Appleton in the 1930 census. Five of the Hahn children are also in the household along with Wayne Nitzband who was born to William and Emma. They can also be found in the 1940 census in Appleton. There are two Hahn children in the household and these three children of William and Emma Nitzband, William, Rodney and Delson.
    Clarence Rehfeldt married Eleanor Drieling around 1930; but a marriage record has not been found. Clarence could not be found in the 1930 census. In the 1940 census Eleanor is living in Appleton with three children, Betty Lou, age 9; Beverly M, age 8 and Clarence, Jr, age 6. Eleanor is a divorcee in this census. Clarence can be found with Eleanor in the Appleton 1932 and 1934 directories, but in subsequent directories Eleanor is listed as Mrs. Eleanor Rehfeldt. It appears that Clarence left the family in about 1935. Eleanor and her children sometime in the 1940’s moved to Washington State where she married George Bronold in Clark County, Washington on 09 Dec 1944. A photo of George and Eleanor’s tombstone can be found at “Find a Grave”.
    It appears that sometime before 1940, Clarence Rehfeldt decided to use the name Robert Carl Chartier as that is the name he used when registered for social security. He and Reta and one child can be found in the 1940 census living in Miami (Dade), Florida. Robert was a salesman for a commercial laundry. Robert was in the U.S. Navy during WWII. His and Reta’s social security cards were issued in Florida. According to Robert’s daughter, Willy Costanza, Robert had two children from an earlier marriage.

     
    CHARTIER, Robert Carl (I4245)
     
    32

    Sophronia and her first husband may have never had a legal marriage, but this is not known for sure. The name of her first husband might be Joseph H. Barber who according to Randy Bassett, a great great grandson of Sophie served with the Michigan 9th Infantry in the Civil War and later is found in Maine and California. When the 1870 census was taken, Sophronia Barber and her son Joseph Barber are living in the home of Sophie’s parents in Wales (St-Clair), Michigan. Sophronia is a school teacher. When the 1880 census was taken, Joseph Barber is still living in the home of Joseph and Sophronia Shirkey in Wales Township. In this census Joseph is listed as a nephew. Sophronia can be found in the 1880 census in New Baltimore (Macomb), Michigan with her husband Dr. Joseph Chapman. Dr. Chapman was a physician. This was a second marriage for him. In the household is a son, Sprague Chapman, age 19, who is a son from Dr. Chapmans first marriage; Leo Chapman, age 3, who is Sophie’s son with Dr. Chapman; and Jane Chapman, age 88, who is Dr. Chapman’s mother. When the 1900 census was taken, Sophie Chapman is a widow. She and her son, Leo M. Chapman are living on South Park Avenue in Chicago, Illinois. Also in the household is James M. Gelatt who is a dealer in patents which is also Leo Chapman’s profession. When the 1910 census was taken, Sophronia and Leo are living at 3838 Vernon Avenue in Chicago. Sophronia is a proprietress of a rooming house and Leo is a line-o-type machinist. When the 1920 census was taken, Sophronia and Leo are now living at 630 Woodland Park in Chicago. Leo is still a line-o-type machinist. When the 1930 census was taken, Sophronia and Leo are still living at 630 Woodland Park in Chicago. But, Sophronia’s son, Joseph H. Barber is also in the household. He is 69. He says he is married, and his first marriage occurred when he was 25; but there is no wife in the household. Leo is still a line-o-type machinist, and Joseph is painting contractor..Mgr Emile Chartier retired in 1944

     
    CHARTIER, Sophronie A. (Sophie) (I7972)
     
    33

    The birth date of Paul Robert is all over the place. The date, 30 Oct 1868 came from the records at St-Come where Louis-Napoleon Chartier-Robert was baptized. On page 258 of Volume II of “The Chartier Families”, Jean Robert has the date of 11 Jun 1866, which can’t be correct. In the 1900 New York Census for Parishville, NY the date is Apr 1872. According to the 1900 census, Paul immigrated to the U.S. in 1885. It appears that he left Quebec for New York without a word to his relatives, to follow in the USA a wood contractor who could offer higher wages. He only came back for a visit 30 years later. In the mean time he had married in the USA and raised a large family. He even saw a fifth generation since he died in his 90’s. His name in the US became “ROBAR”, but in later years some of his children came back to the surname “ROBERT”. When the 1900 U.S. census was taken, the family was living in Parishville (St-Lawrence), NY under the “Robar” name. It is not clear what his occupation was. It appears to be “log driver on ____”. In this census Eliza says she is the mother of 6 children with all 6of them living. However, the twin born in 1898, “Manie Robert” doesn’t appear in this census. When the 1910 census was taken, the family was still living in Parishville; but this time the name is spelled “Robear’. Paul was a “labour – working out”. In this census Paul says he immigrated in 1885; and Eliza says she is the mother of 10 children with nine of them living. Since Napoleon is not in this census, he must have died before 1910; but was there really a twin called “Manie” because that would make 11 children. When the 1920 census was taken, the family was living in Pierrepont (St-Lawrence), NY. “Paul Robert” was now a farmer on a general farm. When the 1930 census was taken, the family was still living in Pierrepont. “Paul P. Robert” was a farmer on a dairy farm. Living nearby were the families of his sons, Harvey C. Robert and Bert J. Robert

     
    CHARTIER-ROBERT, Louis-Napoleon (Paul) (I2894)
     
    34

    The information on this page was first provided by Dana Bobbitt, message No. 157 in Chartier GenForum. According to Dana, one of the following children was born in Brattleboro, Windham, County, VT. When the 1900 census was taken, Eliza Sharkey was heading up this family in Grafton (Windham), Vermont. For some reason, John was not home when this census was taken. Boarding in the home was a French-Canadian by the name of Joseph Neddo. According to Gary Chartier, a descendant, John Sharkey was a logger. He spent most of his time in the logging camps. He traveled up and down the Connecticut River and was gone from home for months at a time. This was well known in the family. Therefore, it is no coincidence that he doesn’t show up as the head of this family when the 1900 census was taken. In this census Eliza and her children were living in Grafton (Windham), Vermont. Eliza says she is 25 years old and has been married 12 years, which would indicate that she was married when she was only 13. She also says that she is the mother of 6 children with 5 of them living. The information asking for the year she immigrated to the U.S. is marked as “un” which probably means unknown. When the 1910 census was taken, Lydia was now living with her second husband of two years; “George Willette” Ouilette in Warren (Worcester), Mass. George was a contractor, railroad ties. Also in this household were Joseph, Ovilla and John Chartier and Olivine and Rose Emma Willette. In this census Lydia says she was the mother of 10 children with six of them living. When the 1920 census was taken, George and Lydia Willette were living at 6 Clinton St. in Ware (Hampshire), Massachusetts. George was a lumberman in a lumber camp. Also, in the household was Rosie Chartier, age 17. She is listed as a step-daughter. When the 1930 census was taken, George and Lydia were living at 38 Eagle St. in Ware. George was a wood-chopper for a lumber company. In this census both George and Lydia said they immigrated in 1884. Lydia and George also say they had their first marriages at age 32 which means Lydia either did not answer the question or did not want to acknowledge her first marriage. When the 1930 census for Belchertown, Mass. was
    taken, there is a John Chartier, born in Canada, age 66 who is a lodger in the home of Lionel and Anna Patenaude. This census records says John is married, but there is no spouse in the household. It also says his first marriage occurred when he was 20 years old. His occupation was farm laborer and he immigrated in 1884.
     
    CHARTIER, Jean-Baptiste (I3445)
     
    35

    The names in the marriage record are written as “Edward Chartier” and Annie Shorkey”. When the 1900 census was taken, this family’s surname was Sharkey and they were living in Gladstone (Delta), Michigan. Edward was a common laborer. When the 1910 census was taken, this family’s surname was Chartier, and they were still living in Gladstone. Edward was a saloonkeeper. In this census Emma says she is the mother of 6 children with 5 of them living. When the 1920 census was taken, this “Edward Sharkey” family was living in the home of Frank and Evelyn Munger. Evelyn Munger was Frank and Emma “Sharkey’s” daughter. They resided on Bush St. East in Nankin (Wayne), Michigan. Edward was a machinist in a tractor plant and Frank Munger was a foreman in house construction. When the 1930 census was taken, Edward, Emma and Edward, Jr. were living at 52222 Kenilworth St. in Dearborn (Wayne), Michigan. Living at the same address was their son, Raymond and his family. Edward was a machine operator in a car factory; Edward, Jr. was a metal finisher in a car factory, and Raymond was a car mechanic in a garage. These families could not be found in the 1920 census. In the 1930 census Edward said he immigrated to the U.S. in 1890. The marriage place and date is based upon a marriage record in the Delta County, Michigan marriages (1862-1927) between an Ed Chartier and an Annie Shorkey. In Polk’s Dearborn (Wayne County, Michigan City Directory for 1941, Edward and Emma lived at 5222 Kenilworth. Edward was a laborer. Edward, Jr. and his wife lived at 6511 Coleman. He was an assembler at a DeSoto factory in Detroit. Ray and Gertrude lived at 4795 Rosalie. He was an employee of Chrysler in Detroit.

     
    CHARTIER, Edouard (I10410)
     
    36

    The present generation has been told that the name was changed from Chartier to Sharkey in Wisconsin. Also, According to some family stories, Tom was involved in the Metis Rebellion in Canada. He was believed to be at Batoche Saskatchewan. He then returned to Wisconsin changed the family name & later moved to New Norway Alberta. Tom became a Northwest Mounted Policeman in Alberta; he was known to be an expert horseman, & expert rifleman. No one knew where his training came from. Younger generations were told that Tom was to be hung with Louis Riel, if he was caught. Sophia Fontaine has been verified as a native; but she was probably part native. Because of her bloodline and Tom’s involvement in the Metis Wars, X- Cliff Sharkey who lives in British Columbia was able to obtain Metis status for the descendants of Thomas Chartier and Sophia Fontaine. This family moved to Camrose, Alberta in 1903 where they kept the Sharkey name, which may have been an effort to hide their French-Canadian roots. French-Canadians were discriminated against in some Western Canadian Provinces. When the 1900 U.S. census was taken, the “Thomas Sharkey” family was living in Rudolph (Wood), Wisconsin. Thomas said he immigrated in 1853 whereas Sophie immigrated in 1869. Thomas was a farmer. Sophie said she was the mother of 12 children with 11 of them living. When the 1911 census was taken, this family was living in Strathcona, Alberta. “Sofi Sharky” was a widow. In her household were Homer, age 23, Arthur, age 17; Ida, age 16; Jesse, age 12, Mabel, age 11; and Mary, age 7. Sofi, Homer and Arthur were farming. These children: Rossyn, Henry, Ato, Iola and Joseph were found in the 1900 census for Rudolph. The other children came from church records and family records

     
    CHARTIER, Damase (Thomas) (I2643)
     
    37

    There is a Eugene Carter, born Canada May 1877, in the home of Leander Lelin in Wilmot (Merrimack), NH when the 1900 census was taken. This Eugene Carter is listed as single and as a son-in-law, which doesn’t make any sense. Since Leander is a widower, it might make more sense that Leander is Eugene’s stepfather. Eugene’s father died young, and Leander might be a second marriage for Eugene’s mother. The name Lelin is hard to read in this census. Leander was a 40 year old farmer; and Eugene was a day laborer. In this census both Leander and Eugene say they immigrated in 1880 and have been in the U.S. 20 years. When the 1910 census was taken, the family of Eugene and Emma Carter were living in Andover (Merrimack), NH. Eugene was a laborer in some kind of mill. In this census Eugene said he immigrated in 1890; and Emma says she is the mother of 4 children with 3 of them living. When the 1920 census was taken, this family was living on “North Road – Lumber Camp” in Warner (Merrimack), NH. In this census Eugene is a teamster for a steam mill, and he says the year he immigrated is unknown, and that he has been a naturalized citizen since 1919. Also in the household were three boarders, Arthur Heman, Harry French, and William D. Evans. Emma and her children could not be found in the 1930 census. However, a Rose Carter, (age 17 and divorced) can be found as a lodger in the home of Charles and Alice Emery in Lebanon. This Rose says she was born in New Hampshire, her father was born in Canada and her mother was born in Vermont. Also, there is a Katherine E., age 5, and Walter E. Carter, age 8, living in the home of William D. and Elizabeth Evans in Lebanon. They are listed as sister-in-law and brother-in-law.

     
    CHARTIER, Joseph-David-Diogene (I3687)
     
    38

    this connection made with reservations. The Massachusetts birth record says his parents are Alexander Chartier and Ann _______ and that Alexander is a musician from Worcester

    The Minnesota Birth and Christening record says Armand Chartier’s parents were Floride Meunier, age 35 and Leon C. Chartier, age 33. In the 1894 Minneapolis City Directory, Leon is living in the home of Matthew L. Chartier at 623 11th Ave. North in Minneapolis. Leon was a clerk. When the 1895 Minnesota census was taken, Florede Meunier was living with her parents, Alexis & Eugenie Meunier at 2512 Humboldt N. in Minneapolis (Hennepin), Minnesota which might indicate that Leon Charles died before that census was taken. In the household was a 5 month old boy, Norman Chartier. When the 1905 Minnesota census was taken, Flored and Armond Chartier were living at 1716 Lyndale in Minneapolis. Flored was a bagmaker. Also in the household were Alex and Jennier Meunier, Flored’s parents. Alex was a retired butcher. When the 1910 census was taken, Florence Chartier, Eugenia Meunier and Armand Chartier were living at 613 Jefferson St. in Minneapolis. Both Florence and Eugenia are listed as widows. In this census Armand says his father was born in Massachusetts and his mother was born in Canada. In the Minnesota City directories, Florida or Floyda Chartier is listed either as a widow of Leon Chartier or Charles L. Chartier. In the 1915 directory, her and her son Armand were living at 1412 North 5th in Minnesota. Armand is a clerk at CGW Railroad. When the 1920 census was taken, Armand A. Chartier was a lodger in the home of Charles & Clara Allan at 3137 Henn. Ave. South. Armand was a clerk for a contractor. When the 1930 census was taken, Armand & Leanore were living at 161 North Chatworth in St Paul (Ramsey), Minnesota. In this census Armand says his father was born in Massachusetts and his mother was born in Canada. Armand was a salesman for a wholesale music wareshouse. Leanore did beauty culture in a beauty shop. There were no children in the household. According to Armand’s death certificate, his father was Leon Chartier; his mother was Floride Neumier and his wife was Lucille Chartier. He died of Anuria due to occlusive artery disease. His death certificate also said he was a representative of the Chicago Musical Co. in Minneapolis. The death certificate also said he served in WWI.

     
    CHARTIER, Leon (I15862)
     
    39

    This connection of Pierre Chartier m. Adeline Godue hasn’t been positively confirmed; therefore, it is made with slight reservations. We know from family history that three Chartier men went from Nashua, NH to Manitoba in ca 1877. These three, Flavien, Jacques and Pierre Chartier worked in an axe factory in Nashua. Since all three of them worked at the same place in Nashua and since all three of them went to Manitoba at about the same; they were probably related. Jacques Chartier has been positively connected to this family. Calixte-Jacques had a son, named Pierre who was born in St Barnabe on 16 Jul 1846. In the 1881 census Pierre gives his age as 34, which means he was born in ca 1846 or 1847. The birth dates and places for Pierre and Adeline come from the Provencher District, Manitoba census 1901: La Broquerie and De Salaberry. A descendant of Pierre and Adeline Chartier who lives in Pitt Meadows, British Columbia have them being born in Nashua, New Hampshire. The decision to move to Manitoba was probably based upon rumors of free land. In the 1870 census for Nashua, NH there is a Pierre Chartier, age 26 whose occupation is a carpenter. This is probably the same Pierre Chartier because in the 1881 Canadian census for St. Boniface, Manitoba Pierre’s occupation is “Menusier” which means “to do carpenters work”. If Pierre was single in 1870 and living in Nashua, then it is quite likely that Pierre and Adeline were married in Nashua. When the 1891 Canadain census was taken, this family was living in Ste-Anne (Provencher), Manitoba. Pierre was a cultivateur. NOTE: WHEN CHARLES WAS BAPTIZED THE RECORD SAID HIS PARENTS HAD A CIVIL MARRIAGE; RELATED TO THE 2ND DEGREE OF CONSANQUINITY

     
    CHARTIER, Pierre (I16331)
     
    40

    Ulysses surname is spelled “Charter” in the Colorado marriage records when he married Ella Hamblin. According to the Denver, Colorado 1890 directory, Ulysses was living at 2920 Blake in Denver. He was a roofer. When the 1900 census was taken, Ulysses and Susan were living in the South Boise Precinct. They had no children. When the 1900 census was taken, Ella and her son, Walter D. Chartier were living in Spokane, Washington. Ella and Walter were boarding in the home of Roger Jones at 1604 Mormon Street. In this census Ella says she is the mother of 3 children with all 3 of them living. After Ella’s name in this census is the name Pearl F. Hamtlain? who is 13 years old. This is probably a child of Ella by a previous marriage. After Ulysses died, Susan married Otis Amasa Long on 9 Dec 1903 in Boise. When the 1910 census was taken, Otis and Susan were living in Boise in the Roseberry Precinct. Sidney Chartier and two daughters, Laura and Alice Long were in the household. When the 1910 census was taken, Ella and Walter were living at 2880 S. Acoma St. in Denver, Colorado. Ella worked in a laundry, and Walter was a clerk at a radiator store. In this census Ella says she is the mother of 5 children with 3 of them living. When Walter Dosia Chartier registered for the WWI draft on June 5, 1917, he said he was single and living with his mother at 2880 South Acoma St. in Englewood, Colorado. And, he said he was an office clerk at the American Radiator Co. in Denver. When the 1920 census was taken, Susan was the head of her household which was living on High St. in Colbran, Colorado. Living in the household with “Susie” were Sidney Chartier and Alice Long. Otis Long died on 06 Sep 1919 in Chicago. When the 1920 census was taken, Ella and Walter were living at 2880 South Acoma St. in Denver. Walter was manager of the shipping department at a Curio Store. When the 1930 census was taken, Sidney was working as a laborer for William McLahan? in Marvin Precinct (Perkins), Nebraska. In 1921 he can be found working for George Thompson in Greene, Iowa. Susan later married a man named Williams, and she died as Susan Rebecca Williams. When the 1930 census was taken, Ella was living by herself at 2125 South Gilpin St. in Denver; and Walter and his wife, Alice, were living at 1206 South Washington St. in Denver. In the 1900, 1910 and 1930 censuses, Ella says she is a widow, but in the 1920 census she says she is a divorcee.

     
    CHARTIER, Ulysses Silas (I8145)
     
    41

    Vice-Rector of l’Universite de Montreal and Dean of the Faculty of Arts.
    Mgr Chartier started his high-school studies a the College of St-Hyacinthe and completed them at Sherbrooke with added theological studies up to 1899.

    He was ordained as a priest on May 28, 1899.

    From Sep 1899 to Jun 1903, he was a teacher of Litterature at The College of St-Hyacinthe.

    From 1903 to 1905, he studied at Roma (Italy) where he received a degree of D..Ph. –Doctor in Philosophy (Roma 1904), and where he also became a “Doctor of The St-Thomas Academy" (Roma 1905). In 1905, he studied at Athena (Greece) and then in Paris (France) until September 1907.

    In Paris, Mgr Emile Chartier studied at “L’Institut Catholique", at The Sorbonne (University of Paris), at L Ecole Pratique des Hautes-Etudes, at College de France, and at Le College Libre des Sciences Sociales. He came back from France with a "Master in Litterature" (Paris 1906) and with a "Fellow in Greek studies" (Paris 1907). Mgr Chartier had already a M.A. (Quebec 1903) and became Doctor in Litterature (University of Montreal).

    At his return (1908), Mgr Chartier became a teacher of a Rhetoric class for about a year. Then he was appointed as a teacher of Litterature at L Universite de Montreal as well as Secretary of The Faculty of Arts. Soon he became General Secretary of The University, then Vice-Rector and Dean of the Faculty of Arts, still teaching French, Greek and Canadian Litteratures.

    Mgr Chartier left many works on Pedagogy and Litterature. From 1908 to 1923, he was Director of “La Revue Canadienne” and was one of the editors of "La Revue Trimestrielle Canadienne" and "L Eneignement Secondaire au Canada”.

    Mgr Chartier in fact wrote all the Canadian part of the famous illustrated book “History of the French Litterature” by J. Calvet. He also wrote “Pages de Combat" (1911); "L art de L Expression Litterature" (1916) and “La vie de L’Esprit" (1941).

    .Mgr Emile Chartier retired in 1944

     
    CHARTIER, Joseph-Etienne-Emile PhD (I18973)
     
    42

    When Charles Everett Sharkey registered for the WWI draft, he and Lena were living at 30 Aspinook St. in Jewett City (New London), Connecticut. Charles was teaming for Shea Bros. in Jewett City. When the 1920 census was taken, this family was living at 16 Anthony St. in Griswold (New London), Connecticut. Charles was a laborer, odd jobs. When the 1930 census was taken, “Everett Shockey” was living in the home of his parents at 6 Aspinook St. in Jewett City. The census record says he is married, but there is no wife or children in the household. Everett is a salesman, groceries. He said he was 17/19 when he first got married. Everett and Lena separated around 1929, and later were divorced. At the time of separation, their 3 sons were placed into the St. Joseph Orphanage in Fall River, Mass., run by French-speaking nuns. They lived in large dorm-like rooms, seeing each other infrequently, since they were separated by age groups. Charlie, the oldest, was taken out after 3 years, in 1932, by Velo, his grandfather, and adopted (not legally). Charlie, his grandparents Velo and Mary, and Hugh Sharkey (Charlies uncle, Everetts brother), all lived together in Jewett City, CT. Since there was no high school in Jewett City, Charlie had to attend the academy in Norwich, CT. Robert was taken out by his mother, Lena, and continued to be brought up by her. They lived in Norwich on Cliff St., and later on Washington St. Donald, the youngest son, was 7 years old when put into the orphanage, and the nuns put him into the 2nd grade. Don was taken out by his father, Everett, when he was about 9, and was put into the 5th grade. Don and Everett moved into a room in a Jewish familys home (the Wechlers). Later they moved to Finns Block in Jewett City. This was a large building containing a movie theater, dentists office, etc. They lived on the 3rd floor, and Charlie, Dons brother, moved in with them, after a while. Around 1938, a hurricane blew off the roof to the building, so Everett and Don moved to an apartment. Charlie, at 19, moved to the Maleks Hotel, and had a room across from his grandfather, Edmond Bechard. Fred Bechard, his uncle, played the fiddle. It seems that when the boys were placed in the St-Joseph orphanage, Lena was living as a lodger in Providence, Rhode Island when the 1930 census was taken. The census states she was 18 when she got married and was working as a waitress in a restaurant. The 1930 census has three boys in the St-Joseph’s orphanage which is located on St-Joseph St. in Fall River (Bristol), Massachusetts who were born in Connecticut, but the names and ages don’t quite match. They are Robert Chartier, age 16, Harold Chartier, age 11, and Daniel Chartier, age 7.
     
    SHARKEY, Charles Everett (Everett) (I9565)
     
    43

    When Henry Chartier registered for the WWI draft, he was living in Manchester (Dickinson), Kansas. He was a laborer for the A.L. & S.F. Railroad Co. According to Lori Billington, great granddaughter of Henry J. Chartier and Mildred Boudreau, there were possibly 13 children in this family. Many of them were placed in foster homes. The first 9 children were found in the 1920 census information for Manchester (Dickinson County), Kansas, where the name is spelled “Shortier”. The place of birth for both Henry and Mildred is recorded as “France” in the 1920 census. In the 1920 census Henry’s occupation is a laborer on the railroad. In the 1930 census Henry’s name is spelled “Harry Chartier”; the family is living in Concordia (Cloud), Kansas and “Harry” is a “laborer, odd jobs”. When the 1940 census was taken, Henry and Bertha were living in Concordia, Kansas. Henry was a laborer doing road work for the PWAA. Also in the home was a stepson, Carl Loutz, age 16. When the 1940 census was taken, Mildred was living with her second husband, Elmer Rogers at 331 West Second St. in Concordia. Elmer was a plastering contractor. According to a newspaper article, Henry committed suicide when the bus he was riding a bus from Salt Lake City to Twin Falls stopped. Henry was complaining all of the way on the ride from Salt Lake City to Twin Falls because he wasn’t allowed to smoke. When he got off at Twin Falls, Henry said “If I can’t smoke I might as well end it all”. He shot himself in the head. The coroner deemed it suicide. When the 1940 census was taken, it looks like Lester and Henrietta were living in the home of Mervyn Hungerford in Anderson (Jackson), Kansas. Mervyn was a farm manager and Lester was working on a soil erosion project for the CCC. The record says Mervyn is married, but there is no wife in the household.

     
    CHARTIER, Henry John (I14080)
     
    44

    When Mike Shorkey and Sepherina Santamoree were married, the “Return of Marriage” in Alger County said Mike Shorkey’s father was Joseph Shorkey and his mother was “______Murshall. When the 1900 census was taken, this family was living in Onota (Alger), Michigan. Michael Shorkey was a day laborer. He said he immigrated to the U.S. in 1879, but he can be found with his family in the 1881 Canadian census. Jeferia said she was the mother of 5 children with 2 of them living. When the 1910 census was taken, this family was living in Marquette (Marquette), Michigan. Michal Sharkey was an ore trimmer for an ore works. It looks like in this census, Michal said he immigrated in 1883. In this census Josephine said she was the mother of 10 children with 7 of them living. When the 1920 census was taken, Michel must have died because Vina was now married to Reil De Larye. The family was living at 602 Division St. in Marquette. Reil was a house carpenter. Also in the household was Hazel Wright who is listed as a daughter. She is probably the oldest daughter of Michel. Also in the household were Dora Delarye, age 19, Arthur Delarye, age 17, Jan Delarye, age 13, Earl Delarye, age 1-6/12; Leonard Shorkey, age 19, Florence Shorkey, age 17, Henry Shorkey, age 16, Dewey Shorkey, age 13, Ernest Shorkey, age 11, Laura Shorkey, age 10, and Francis Shorkey, age 6. These Shorkey children are listed as step-children. When the 1930 census was taken, Reil and Vina Delario were living on Road M48 U.S. 41 in Chocolay (Marquette), Michigan. Riel was a storekeeper (grocery & oil). Also in the household was Earl Delario, age 12, Francis Shorkey, age 17, Catharine Wright, age 14, and a boarder by the name of Alfred Cadotte, age 45. Francis was a laborer at a chicken ranch.

     
    CHARTIER, Maxime (I6655)
     
    45

    When Ovilla registered for the WWI draft on June 5, 1917, he and his wife and her 6 year old child were living in North Chester (Hampden), Massachusetts. He was a farmer. Edith had an earlier marriage to Franklin Tubbs who she married on 4 Jul 1907 in Lebanon Springs, New York. In the 1910 census Edith said she had one child, but none living. However, Edith and Frank had a daughter ,Vera Lulu Tubbs, who was born on 04 Feb 1911 in Chester, Massachusetts. When the 1930 census was taken, O.H. and Rachel Sharkey were living at 2115 Linden Ave. in Queens, New York City. O.H. was a veteran and a superintendent which may mean he was the superintendent of the building that he and Rachel lived in since they also said they lived rent free. Rachel said she immigrated in 1890. When “Oliver H. Sharkey” married “Rachel Naylor”, he said he was 37; single; a painter; and living at 88 Halleck St. in Brooklyn, New York. Rachel said she was 39, single and living at 88 Halleck Pl. in Brooklyn. Rachel’s first husband was George Naylor. When their daughter, Emily Naylor was born on 13 Apr 1903, they were living in Isle La Motte, Vermont . When Ovella (name on death certificate) died, his death certificate said he was a resident of Walden (Orange), New York and his occupation was handyman working in the New York City Aquadact. For some reason Ovilla Sharkey was buried as Oliver Sharkey. When Rachel died, she was survived by her daughter, Mrs. George J. Anderson in Fairlawn, New Jersey and by her son William H. Naylor who became a Brigadier General and commanded the 76th Infantry Division, U.S. Army Reserve. He retired in 1958 to devote more time to his civilian work as vice president of Stanley Home Products, Inc. of Westfield, Mass. According to a granddaughter of Rachel, Rachels’ first husband was a ship’s captian on the St Lawrence River and they lived in Malone, NY. Ovilla was inducted in Lee, Mass. on 06Oct1917, two months after Ediths death. Vera Lulu went to live with her grandparents. He served overseas from 26 Nov 1917 to 09 Jun 1919 and was assigned to Company A of the 504th Engineers. He was honorably discharged on 17 Jun 1919 at Camp Devens, Mass.
     
    SHARKEY, Ovilla H. (I3456)
     
    46

    When Peare Robinson married Louise, he was a “hatter” in Haverhill, Mass. When the 1910 census was taken, the Peter Robinson family was living at 60 Plummer in Manchester, NH. Peter was a laborer for a leather board. Living in the same home was the family of Louise Vallee who was Peter’s sister. In this census Dora says she is the mother of 3 children with all 3 of them living. When Peter Robinson registered for the WWI draft, he was living at the corner of Pine and Willow in Manchester, NH. He was a B and M laborer. When the 1920 census was taken, this family was living on Saxson Ave. (RFD) in Manchester. Peter was a widower and a teamster for a lumber company.Both Frederick and Ethel were in the household, but Earl was absent. When Peter married Nora Sullivan, their marriage record said that both of them were living at 518 Maple St. in Manchester and that Peter was a mill operator. When the 1930 census was taken, this family was living at 154 Central St. in Manchester. Peter was a washer in a cotton mill. In this census Peter said his first marriage took place when he ws 21, and Nora said her first marriage took place when she was 27. When Peter Robinson died, his obituary said he was born in Littleton, NH and had been a resident of Manchester for more than 50 years. It also said he was employed by the PWA. His obit also said he was survived by his wife, seven sons, Earl and Fredrick Robinson, Arthur and John Merrill, William Wells and Joseph Merrill of Manchester and Lt. Lew Merrill of Tampa, Florida and by 5 daughters, Mrs. Thomas Clark, Mrs. Minnie Riley, Mrs. Jennie Coco, Mrs. Louise Verfaille, and Mrs. Florence Jacques. It looks like Nora had at least 3 marriages before she married Peter. First one was to a Mr. Myrll Merrill; second one was to a Mr. Wells, and the third one was to a Mr. James F. Sullivan. In the 1920 census she is Nora Sullivan, widow.

     
    CHARTIER-ROBINSON, Pierre Paul Maxime (Peter) (I3528)
     
    47

    When the 1850 census was taken, “William and Jestine Shirkey” were living in Ira (St Clair), Michigan. William was a laborer. When the 1860 census was taken, Gabriel and Justin Chortie were still living in Ira. In the household were Gabriel, Jr., Charley, and Olive. This would indicate that Justine, Jr. had died before this census was taken. Gabriel was a farmer. When the 1870 census was taken, Gabriel and Justine were still living in Ira. Gabriel was a farmer. In the household were Gabriel, Jr. who was a sailor and Charles, Eliza, Joseph, Henry, Benjamin, and Lewis. When the 1880 census was taken, Gabriel and Mary were in Ira Township (St Clair), Michigan. Gabriel was a farmer. Also in the household were Joseph who was a sailor; Henry who worked on the farm; Barney and Louis who were at school; and August who was 10/12 years old. This census would indicate that Louis, Josephine, Louisa and Etienne had died before this census was taken. When the 1900 census was taken, “Gabrial and Mary Chercus” (indexed this way at ancestry.com) were living in Ira (St-Clair), Michigan. Gabrial was a farmer. In this census Mary said she had 8 children with 5 of them living. When the 1910 census was taken, Mary Chartier, age 57, and a widow was living on Lake Shore Road in Ira with her son, John B. Chartier, her daughter, Mary V. Chartier, and her niece, Laurette B. Chartier, age 4. She was a farmer and John B. was fireman in some kind of Steam machine. When the 1920 census was taken, Mary Shorkey and her grandchild, Loretta Shorkey, age 14, were living on Lake Shore Road in Ira. According to the obituary for Mrs. James Dibble, there were 22 children in the family. Based upon the 1900 census, Mary only had 8 children; therefore, there might be a child missing from the marriage of Gabriel and Justine

     
    CHARTIER, William Gabriel (I8641)
     
    48

    When the 1860 census was taken, this family was living in Grand Rapids (Wood), Wisconsin. Joseph was a “sawyer”. When the 1870 census was taken, they are found in the Town of Rudolph, Wisconsin. It looks like the census taker spelled the name “Schortir”. Living in Joseph’s household when this census was taken were his wife and these children, Louis, Dennis, Henry, Georgiana, and Delena. Their daughter Rosaline Richards and John B. Richards, age 32 were also in the household. When the 1880 census was taken the family was living in Port Edwards, Wisconsin. In this census their son Amos was also living with them whereas he was not living with the family when the 1870 census was taken. Amos’ marital status is checked as single whereas his brother Joseph’s marital status is checked as married. It is known that Joseph never married so it appears that the census taker made a mistake in checking off the marital status of these two brothers. Amos not being with the family in 1870 is important because according to family tradition he married a Chippewa Indian and lived somewhere in Canada. Why Amos shows up with his father’s family in the 1880 census is not known, but he may have come back for a visit or to work. In the 1900 U.S. census Joseph says the family immigrated to the U.S. in 1852. Since their son, Joseph was born in St-Lin, Quebec in 1852; they probably made the move shortly after his birth. Exactly where they moved to in 1852 isn’t known at this time. When the 1900 census was taken, Joseph and Constance were living at 500 Cleveland in Merrill City. Living in Joseph and Constance’s household were their unmarried son, Joseph and the family of their youngest child, Frank Chartier.

     
    CHARTIER, Joseph (I2229)
     
    49

    When the 1870 census was taken, this family was living in Ishpeming Township (Marquette), Michigan. John “Morrey” was a laborer. Could not find this family in 1880 census. When the 1900 census was taken, this family was living at 521 Wells Ave. in Escanaba (Delta), Michigan. It looks like John worked for the railroad. It also appears that his sons, Steven and Albert were day laborers on the railroad. In this census Matilda says she is the mother of 13 children with 11 of them living. When the 1910 census was taken, this family was living at 514 Wolcott St. in Escanaba. John was a labour; Anthony was a cook at a café; Lizzie was a servant for a private family; and John was a labour. In this census Matilda said she was the mother of 9 children with 4 of them living which, of course, doesn’t make any sense. She had five children in the household in this census; Frank Anthony, Lizzie, John and Arthur. COULD NOT FIND THEM IN THE 1920 CENSUS. When the 1930 census was taken, Mathilda was a widow living at 901 First Ave. in Escanaba. Also, in the household were two of her sons, Steven and John Murray. Steven was a woodsman working in the woods and John was a laborer in a railroad yard. John died from exposure after he had fallen from the Merchant’s dock on the ice on a Tuesday, Feb 9 1926. At that time he was living at 1007 First Avenue South. He left his home to haul home some wood. When he did not arrive at supper time, his sons searched for him and found him unconscious at 7 p.m.. Examination revealed that he had injured his spine from the fall and died from exposure. John’s obit said he was born in Canada. However, the family says he was born near Detroit, and the 1870, 1900, and 1910 censuses all say he was born in Michigan. At the time of his death he was survived by one daughter, eight sons, 17 grandchildren and one great grandchild. John’s body was taken to the Allo Funeral Home and later removed to the home of his son, Albery Murray at 410 South Eleventh Avenue. Family members say that John was adopted by a Murray family, but there is nothing to indicate that is true or not. When Edward and Albert married, they said their father’s name was Edward Chartier. John Murray’s obituary says he was also known as John Chartier.

     
    CHARTIER-SHIRKEY, Edouard (John Murray) (I7878)
     
    50

    When the 1870 census was taken, this family was living in Whiting (Addison), Vermont. Lewis Shortker was a farm laborer. When the 1880 census was taken, the “Lewis Shorten” family was living in Cornwall (Addison), Vermont. Lewis was a laborer. When the 1900 census was taken, Louis and Jennie were living in Whiting (Addison), Vermont. Louis was a house painter, and he said he immigrated in 1857. In this census Jennie said she was the mother of 8 children with 6 of them living. When the 1900 census was taken, Sarah Champagne was heading up her family in Williston (Chittenden), Vermont. She says she is married, but there is no husband in the household. She says she has been married for 11 years; and that she has had 5 children with 4 of them living. In the household were the following children: Wallace, born March 1889; Mabel, born July 1890; Eddie, born February 1894; and Ray, born September 1895. Sarah was a day laborer. When the 1910 census was taken, “Alice Sharkey” and Ila and Stanley Sharkey were living in the home of Bertram G. and Mabel Deputron at 18 Baxter St. in Rutland (Rutland), Vermont. Alice was a shirt maker in a factory. In this census Alice says this is her 2nd marriage; she had been married 10 years; and she had 6 children with all 6 of them living. When the 1920 census was taken, Lewis, Sarah, Ila and Stanley Sharkey were living in Billeria (Middlesex), Massachusetts. Lewis was a laborer, working out. Also in the household is Margarita Myers, age 4/12 who is listed as a granddaughter. When the 1930 census was taken, Sarah A. and Stanley Sharkey were living in Salem (Washington), New York. Sarah was a shirt maker in a shirt factory and Stanley was a laborer in a Dairy Barn. Also, in the household was Margarite Sharkey who is 8 years old and is listed as a daughter, but she is probably Sarah’s granddaughter; Margarita Myers. When Sarah died, her Vermont death record said she died in the Rutland, Vermont hospital even though her usual residence was Poughkeepsie, New York

     
    SHORKEY, Louis (Lewis) (I4735)
     

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